redistricting

Jorge Sanhueza-Lyon / KUT

The U.S. Supreme Court did something out of the ordinary last week: It responded to an appeal when there was technically nothing to appeal.  

Illustration by Todd Wiseman

A lower court ruling that invalidated parts of the Texas House state map has been temporarily blocked by the U.S. Supreme Court.

Illustration by Todd Wiseman

The U.S. Supreme Court on Monday put on hold a lower court ruling that invalidated two of Texas' 36 congressional districts.

In an order signed by Justice Samuel Alito, the high court indicated it wanted to hear from the minority groups suing the state before the state's appeal of that ruling moves forward. The high court ordered the state's legal foes to file a response by Sept. 5 to the state's efforts to keep congressional district boundaries intact for the 2018 elections.

Miguel Gutierrez Jr. / KUT

In the past two decades, congressional maps in Texas have changed six times. Those changes have often been felt here in Austin.

“Well, our congressman went from being [Lloyd] Doggett, to being [Michael] McCaul, and now we're in Bill Flores’ district,” says Eric Calistri, a resident of North Austin who has lived in the same house for about two decades.

Todd Wiseman / Texas Tribune

Parts of the Texas House map must be redrawn ahead of the 2018 elections because lawmakers intentionally discriminated against minorities in crafting a handful of districts, federal judges ruled on Thursday. 

A three-judge panel in San Antonio unanimously invalidated some of the state’s 150 state House districts, which will force lawmakers to correct violations. Specifically listed are districts in Bell, Dallas, Nueces and Tarrant counties.

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