Texas

News, policy discussions, and major events happening in or related to Texas, told from an Austin perspective

Joy Diaz/Texas Standard

From Texas Standard:

El Rancho Supermarkets are like New York's bodegas – but on steroids. The aisles are still pretty narrow but the produce is fresh and affordable. You can find authentic products from Latin America, so this place is a magnet for people like me – foreign-born.

A portion of the south Texas border fence and remote surveillance cameras.
Donna Burton/U.S. Customs and Border Protection (U.S. Government Work)

From Texas Standard:

Homeland Security Secretary John Kelly said just yesterday that it is "unlikely" that a wall along the United States' southern border will be built in full. That’s different from the Trump administration's original proposed plans to build a continuous 30-foot wall, regardless of the terrain and other potential obstacles.

 

World War I victory parade in downtown Austin.
UT Austin Briscoe Center for American History

From Texas Standard:

The United States officially entered World War I 100 years ago, Thursday. While the fighting took place overseas, the war’s impact was far flung, much of it striking right here in Texas.

Congressman Ted Poe
U.S. House of Representatives/Wikimedia Commons (Public Domain)

From Texas Standard:

Congressman Ted Poe (R-Humble) surprised observers last week when he announced he would leave the House Freedom Caucus, a group of conservative lawmakers whose opposition to the American Health Care Act (AHCA) put them at odds with President Donald Trump and House leadership.

U.N. Security Council chamber
Jessica Spengler/Flickr (CC BY 2.0)

From Texas Standard:

Tuesday, Syria launched a chemical gas attack on a northern area held by rebels. Pope Francis has called the attack an “unacceptable massacre,” according to the New York Times. And an unnamed state department official has called it a war crime.

Miguel Gutierrez Jr./KUT News.

From Texas Standard:

Groups supporting President Donald Trump’s policies like ‘Great America Alliance’, ‘America First Policies’, and ‘Making America Great’ provide cover for ongoing political fights – from healthcare to the nomination of Neil Gorsuch for the Supreme Court. But there are signs that these groups are willing to go so far in promoting the Trump agenda that they could end up turning their fire on fellow members of the GOP who don't cooperate with their goals.

Wikimedia Commons (Public Domain)

From Texas Standard:

The filibuster – in which a senator or group of senators can control the Senate floor as long as they continue speaking – is a tool of the underdog. And if Senate Republicans don’t get the votes they need to confirm Supreme Court nominee Neil Gorsuch, the filibuster may be history.

Gage Skidmore/Flickr (CC BY-SA 2.0)

From Texas Standard:

Debates over the budget, the bathroom bils and sanctuary cities are getting national attention, and Lt. Gov. Dan Patrick and House Speaker Joe Straus get a lot of the headlines. But what about Governor Greg Abbott? Why has he been so quiet?

Jorge Sanhueza-Lyon/KUT News

From Texas Standard:

U.S. Sen. Ted Cruz has drawn his first election challenger. Democratic Congressman Beto O’Rourke of El Paso announced his intention to run for the Democratic Senate nomination in 2018, after which he would likely face Cruz in the general election. O’Rourke spent the weekend holding rallies around the state to announce his candidacy.

Immigration and Customs Enforcement

The U.S. Immigration and Customs Enforcement agency arrested 153 undocumented immigrants in the South and Central Texas regions during its most recent round of immigration enforcement. 

TDCJ/Abby Livingston

The U.S. Supreme Court agreed Monday to hear the Texas death penalty case of a Honduran national who is arguing that a federal appeals court wrongly denied him resources to investigate and provide evidence of substance abuse and mental illness.

As Donald Trump regularly spotlights violent crimes committed by immigrants who are in the country illegally, outrage is increasingly bubbling up in communities across the country.

In San Antonio last month, authorities charged 35-year-old Armando Rodrigo Garcia-Ramires, a Mexican national, with double capital murder in the shooting death of a 15-year-old girl, who was nine months pregnant with his child. The fetus died, too.

Jacob Croft Botte

From Texas Standard:

The Blanco River is only 87 miles long, winding its way from the tiny Central Texas community of Lindendale to the city and river of San Marcos.

Sarangib/Pixabay (Public Domain)

From Texas Standard:

During the 2016 presidential campaign, Donald Trump famously criticized NAFTA as the “worst trade deal ever signed in this country.” President Trump is now taking a somewhat softer line on NAFTA. A draft letter from the White House emerged this week that indicates the administration wants to re-negotiate the trade agreement with Mexico and Canada, leaving some provisions in place, while seeking changes to others. The document contains few details, but it does indicate that the president would like the ability to impose tariffs on some imported products. Re-opening NAFTA negotiations would require Congressional approval.

Alex Proimos/Flickr (CC BY-NC 2.0)

From Texas Standard:

Pain is one of those things that is hard to wrap your head around - it's hard to measure, it varies according to your age and health condition. And pain and what we know about pain – particularly chronic pain – also varies by race.

When Bessie Coleman wanted to become a pilot, no flying school would admit her because she was black and a woman. Undeterred, Coleman—who was born in Atlanta, Texas, and grew up in a poor sharecropper family in Waxahachie—obtained a sponsor and went to France for training. In 1921, she became the first black woman in the world to earn a pilot’s license. She returned to the U.S. and flew in a series of airshows, performing stunts whenever she could borrow an airplane. Her dream was to earn enough money to buy her own plane and to establish a flying school for African-Americans.

Marjorie Kamys Cotera / Bob Daemmrich

A lot has happened since 2013, when then-Gov. Rick Perry followed through on a threat to veto $7.5 million in funding for the state’s Public Integrity Unit, which investigated public corruption and was housed in the Travis County District Attorney’s office.

Shelby Knowles for The Texas Tribune

As North Carolina lawmakers voted Thursday to revise that state's bathroom law, Texas Republicans pushing a similar measure said they are not backing away from their proposal.

JD Lasica/Flickr (CC BY-NC 2.0)

From Texas Standard:

It's possible another billionaire who speaks his mind, is no stranger to TV, and has ideas about running the country could be the next President of the United States. Texas Monthly's Skip Hollandsworth poses the question in an article about Texan Mark Cuban, "Cuban Revolution".

Jorge Sanhueza-Lyon/KUT News

From Texas Standard:

Texas Agriculture Commissioner Sid Miller announced a trade agreement Wednesday between the state and a group of settlers on the West Bank of Israel. Neither the U.S. government nor the United Nations recognizes the settlements.

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